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SPRING 2013

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Distributor's Link Magazine Spring Issue 2013 / VOL 36 / NO.2

90 THE DISTRIBUTOR’S

90 THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK Rotor Clip Company Inc. 187 Davidson Avenue, Somerset, NJ 08873 Tel: 1-800-557-6867 Fax: 732-469-7898 Email: info@www.rotorclip.com www.rotorclip.com RETAINING RINGS REPLACE “NUT AND BOLT” FASTENERS IN ROCKER ARM ASSEMBLY by Vincent E. Rodgers High performance rocker arms add horse power to an engine and retaining rings have played a role in their development. Shaft mount rocker arms are mounted on a shaft for extra rigidity, reduction of vibrations and elimination of uncontrolled valve train motion at high RPMs. They are made of stainless steel or another light material. They also feature a trunnion (a pivot point) along with a bearing inside the arm to reduce friction and wear. The bearings and trunnion are held in place by an external retaining ring on each side of the rocker, mounted directly on the shaft. This replaces the conventional “nut and bolt” rocker arm assembly found in standard engines. A pre-cut groove in the shaft firmly secures the retaining ring in place, the shoulder of the ring retaining the rocker arm bearing. If the rocker arm becomes damaged and needs to be replaced, the ring can be easily removed and the rocker arm can slide off the shaft. Racing enthusiasts go to great lengths to reduce weight without sacrificing power and ease of access for replacement in the field. The rocker arm and retaining ring combination is an excellent example of how this is accomplished. A rocker arm is used in combustible engines like cars, trucks, boats, motorcycles and airplanes. Rocker arms are important when it comes to engine performance. Standard engine rocker arms or roller tipped rocker arms are the most common. They are made from stamped steel and bolted to the block. Rocker arms are connected to pushrods inside the block which are connected to valve springs that are under extreme amounts of pressure. When the cam shaft rotates, it makes contact with the pushrods connected to the rocker arm, opening the valve to let air in. When the connection between the pushrod and cam shaft is broken, the springs snap back closing the intake value. When the cam shaft rotates again it hits the pushrod and rocker arm once more letting out exhaust. Again, when the connection is broken, the springs snap back, closing the valve. Essentially, the action is a “rocking” motion, opening and closing valves, like rocking in a chair. Hence the name, rocker arm.

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 91

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