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Distributor's Link Magazine Spring 2019 / Vol 42 No2

108 THE DISTRIBUTOR’S

108 THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK GUY AVELLON WHAT FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT WHEEL STUDS AND LUG NUTS - PART 2 from page 26 Overtorquing leads to a weakened and loose joint as neither problem is visually detectable. The internal threads of the wheel nut will look fine on the outside and the thread pitch of the wheel studs may appear to also be good. The damaged wheel nut may even be able to thread onto the wheel stud but more torque will be necessary to overcome the increased friction between the mating threads than is applied to tighten the joint and increase clamp load. Clamp load is therefore lost even though the proper torque was applied. Proper procedures: these include removing as much rust as possible by wire brushing the wheel hub and wheel stud threads to assure a clean and sound fit; making sure there is no grease or lubricant present by spraying the surfaces with a brake cleaner; snug up the wheel before applying the torque, doing so causes the wheel joint to normally relax; apply the torque in a criss-cross pattern, this is to assure that one side of the wheel does not become tighter than the other; after all the wheels have been tightened, retighten them, as this will serve to regain some of the normal residual joint relaxation and assure a sound clamp load. Finally, and most important, retorque the wheel nuts after driving 50-100 miles (80-160 km). This procedure is recommended by the auto manufacturers and the NTSB as it will assure the joint has settled in after experiencing road impacts and cornering loads. After the initial impact of the wheel nut slamming into the wheel by the air gun, there is some rebound effect, where the joint compresses suddenly then springs back. This is why it is important to retorque the wheel nuts even after using a torque wrench. In the assembly factories, gang socket machines will apply the torque to the wheel nuts simultaneously. This eliminates the elastic rebound. Unfortunately, we cannot duplicate this method but the methods described above will closely duplicate factory assembly. Interesting to note that in image - the wheel boss surface at marker #1 is not as damaged as the other mounting surfaces. This is because this wheel stud had fractured long before causing the wheel to become loose. Subsequently, as the wheel became loose, the wheel nuts backed off. Marker #4 indicating the final separation of the wheel and markers #3 indicate where excessive impacting of an unregulated impact gun caused embedment and further loss of clamp load. Rust: this is a barrier layer that continues to grow and form a compressible cushion between the joint. Even if wire brushed off, the rust will continue. The only way to completely stop this chemical reaction is to remove the embedded chlorides from the steel by either sand blasting or chemically. Salt and brine, though effective in melting ice, are sprayed on the road and will be thrown all over the wheel assemblies and as a liquid, will penetrate tight areas. This will cause spreading of the electrolyte, where it becomes trapped in some areas and will cause the rust to grow significantly. The pressure created would weaken the threads of the wheel nut, further weaken the threads of previously damaged threads and even cause joint separation. Wash frequently. Right side of the vehicle: this side will commonly fail from metal fatigue. This is the side that will hit pot holes, storm grates and other road irregularities causing an impacting to the wheel joint and looseness. Metal fatigue occurs in heat treated steels that have been subjected to frequent loads that are much below their tensile strength but loads that will cause stress raisers in the thread roots. CONTINUED ON PAGE 156

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 109 Semblex Corporation a leading manufacturer of fasteners and cold-headed components for the automotive, commercial, and distribution markets - has announced the upcoming retirement of Don Cunningham, the company’s President since 2010. Mr. Cunningham’s retirement will be effective at the end of the first quarter, 2019. Mr. Cunningham will then continue as a member of the Semblex Board of Directors and as a part time advisor to the company. Jinsoo Kim will succeed Mr. Cunningham as president of Semblex. Mr. Kim has served as Chief Operating Officer at Semblex since the company’s acquisition by Jinhap Company, Ltd in early 2014. Previously, Mr. Kim was a Senior Vice President at Jinhap in South Korea. Simultaneously, Gene Simpson will assume the role of Senior Vice President and COO. Mr. Simpson is a 27-year veteran at Semblex, most recently serving as Vice President of Engineering & Quality. Reporting to Mr. Simpson will be Quality, Engineering, Sales & Marketing and Operations. These changes to the company’s senior management structure demonstrate Jinhap’s long term vision, and positions Semblex for continued growth and success. For more information, contact Semblex Corporation at 900 North Church Road, Elmhurst, IL 60126. Tel: 1-800-323-1736, Fax: 630-530-8189, Email: sales@semblex.com or visit their website at www.semblex.com.

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