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Distributor's Link Magazine Spring 2019 / Vol 42 No2

128 THE DISTRIBUTOR’S

128 THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK GARY SHEELY 6 RISKY MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT WORKPLACE VIOLENCE from page 54 What To Avoid In An Anti-Violence Policy Several elements are recommended for an antiviolence policy; conversely it’s a good idea to be wary of the following. Profiles of employees who might become violent. This kind of profiling is of less than little value. In addition, profiles that include race, sex or age may actually violate anti-discrimination laws. Use caution to identify behaviors and not the person. “Zero Tolerance” provisions. While it’s optimal to have clear guidelines for prohibited behavior, there are several possible problems with a zero-tolerance clause. An employee might violate progressive discipline practices in the workplace, and perhaps even provisions in workers’ employment contracts. Zero tolerance provisions can be abused by management. An example of abuse would be for a supervisor to intentionally provoke a worker into losing his or her temper in order to find grounds for dismissal. It leaves no room for any consideration of misinterpretation or cultural diversity. What might be seen as harmless and normal by people in some generational, religious or ethnic groups could be received as a threat by members of other groups. Failure to include equal representation on Assessment Teams. Assessment Teams that are completely one-sided favoring members of management may suffer a credibility crisis among workers in the event of an incident involving any sort of controversy. To develop and implement an effective anti-violence policy, it is essential to consider what should not be included along with what to include. Worth The Time While most agree about the importance developing an anti-violence policy, it does not seem like an urgent issue until an incident has occurred. It’s true, developing and tailoring such policies to your workplace can be time-consuming and tedious, it’s far less trouble than dealing with even just one incident that might have been prevented. GARY SHEELY MAFDA CHRISTMAS GALA BRANDYWINE PRIME, CHADDS FORD, PA - DEC 20, 2018

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 129 New PEM® SMTSK unthreaded standoffs from PennEngineering ® permanently surface mount on printed circuit boards to enable quick attachment and removal of stacked components without requiring screws or tools. Their unique barrel design allows for a stacked board or panel to be slipped easily into place and then detached by simply sliding the component sideways and lifting it off. These standoffs will effectively serve to attach and space components either horizontally or vertically using minimal hardware and fewer assembly operations. The standoffs are supplied on tape and reel compatible with existing SMT automated installation equipment and will mount on printed circuit boards in the same manner and at the same time as other surface mount components prior to the automated reflow solder process. These hardware solutions ultimately can reduce handling issues, risks of board damage, and costly scrap, while promoting streamlined production and “screwless” designs of subassemblies. PEM SMTSK standoffs are manufactured from carbon steel and available in unified lengths .125”, 250,” and .375” and in metric lengths 3mm, 4mm, 6mm, 8mm, and 10mm. They will install successfully in boards as thin as .060” and 1.53mm. These standoffs are the latest addition to the complete line of PEM® ReelFast® surface mounted fasteners, which also include other non-threaded and threaded standoffs, standard and micro nuts, right-angle fasteners, and captive panel screws. Detailed specifications, drawings and 3D models, and performance data (Bulletin SMTSK) for these RoHS-compliant fasteners can be viewed and downloaded for free at www. pemnet.com. Founded in 1942, PennEngineering (Danboro, PA, USA) is a global leader in the fastening industry with technical and manufacturing facilities in North America, Europe, and Asia supported by a global engineering-focused sales force and a worldwide network of authorized distributors. For more information, contact Michael J. Rossi, PennEngineering at 5190 Old Easton Road, Danboro, PA 18916-1000 USA. Tel: +1-215- 766-8853, email: info@pemnet. com or visit them online at www.pemnet.com.

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