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SUMMER 2011

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Distributor's Link Magazine Summer Issue 2011 / VOL 34 / NO.3

60 THE DISTRIBUTOR’S

60 THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK mistake, it occurs in smaller ways thousands of times a day. It occurs when sales people feel the need to tell the customer everything they know about the product or service they are presenting, whether the customer cares or is interested in that feature or not. The problem is greater than just “too much information.” Sales people who do this disrespect the customer, as they don’t take the customer’s interests and requirements into account in the presentation. As a result, customers are turned off and tuned out, and sales people leave shaking their heads, unable to fathom why the customer didn’t buy all the incredible features of his sales presentation. THE THREE BIGGEST MISTAKES IN SALES PRESENTATIONS continued from page 50 We were methodically working through the sales process, and it was time to make the sales presentation. The class was taught to organize the presentation on the basis of what they learned about the customer in the previous “find out what they want” role play. One particular sales person never got that message. He thought a sales presentation was like an oral exam in school. It was his opportunity to spill everything he knew about the product. What should have been a 20 minute presentation dragged on and on for 45 minutes. Even though it was a role play in front of the class, even though it was being video recorded, the person playing the customer began to fall asleep. The hapless sales person continued on, purging himself of every bit and morsel of related information. I had to finally step in and put an end to the tedium. While that may have been a dramatic example of this 3. Failure to Include the Customer in the Presentation This occurs when the sales person thinks that the presentation is all about his product, service or proposal. The truth is that effective sales presentations are always about two things: the offer, and how it can impact the customer. When sales people simply talk about their offer, and ignore the second half of the equation, they make one of the most common mistakes. Customers are far more interested in how the thing being presented impacts them, than they are in the details of the offer. The sales person may be impressed with all the neat details and features, but that reflects his/her values, not necessarily those of the customer. The best sales presentations describe the salient features of the offer, and then relate them to how they impact the customer. Remember “features and benefits” This third most common mistake occurs when sales people emphasize the features, and forget the benefits. If you are guilty of any of these mistakes, or, as a manager, if your sales force is guilty of them, their sales presentations are not as effective as they could be. You are leaving money on the table. Fix these mistakes, and watch your sales rise. Left to learn on their own, many sales people make the same mistakes over and over again.

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