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SUMMER 2018

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Distributor's Link Magazine Summer 2018 / Vol 41 No3

106 THE DISTRIBUTOR’S

106 THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK MSC INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY CO. 75 Maxess Road, Melville, NY 11747 TEL 1-800-645-7270 EMAIL info@mscdirect.com WEB www.mscdirect.com MSC ACQUIRES ALL INTEGRATED SOLUTIONS (AIS) MSC Industrial Supply Co., a premier distributor of Metalworking and Maintenance, Repair and Operations (MRO) products and services to industrial customers throughout North America, has acquired All Integrated Solutions (AIS) from New York-based private equity firm High Road Capital Partners. AIS is a leading value-added distributor of industrial fasteners and components, MRO supplies and assembly tools based in Franksville, WI. AIS delivers production fasteners and custom tool and fastener solutions for use in the assembly of manufactured commercial and consumer products. The company’s 135-plus associates serve customers in a region that includes WI, MN, MI, IA, IN and ND. AIS’s revenue in 2017 was approx million. MSC plans to maintain AIS’s operations, providing the company’s customer base access to MSC’s 1.5 millionplus product portfolio to support their full metalworking and MRO needs. Similarly, MSC will extend AIS’s production fastener and vendor-managed inventory (VMI) solutions to MSC’s manufacturing customers. “AIS represents an exciting opportunity to advance MSC’s growth plan. Its assembly and fastener products and specialists extend our expertise in delivering solutions to help customers solve their mission-critical challenges on the plant floor,” said MSC President & CEO Erik Gershwind.“ In addition, AIS also complements our robust Class C fastener offering and VMI solutions.” Rustom Jilla, MSC’s executive vice president and chief financial officer, said, “This acquisition of AIS aligns very well with our strategy and our capital allocation philosophy, representing an exciting opportunity for MSC. Jim Ruetz, chief executive officer of AIS, added, “MSC shares our passion for delivering high-touch, custom solutions that go well beyond ordering MRO and production products online. Both organizations make sure the right fasteners and supplies are available when our customers need them without fail. We are looking forward to providing even more turn-key solutions to our customers by leveraging MSC’s vast MRO and metalworking product and solutions portfolio, expanding our reach in the Midwest.” BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE MSC INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY CO. JIM TRUESDELL A GOOD JOB MARKET IS GREAT...UNLESS YOU ARE HIRING! from page 26 This means that a company has to be in a defensive posture with its current employee base, making sure they are in tune with the current market for wages, benefits (including the all important cost and quality of health care coverage) and a friendly workplace environment. Today’s worker is not so leery of leaving a job as was his or her predecessor of yesteryear any way. So, just as companies are accused of showing no loyalty to their workers in a “what have you done for us lately” mode, so then do employees expect their employers to be concerned with employee job satisfaction. This goes beyond wages and benefits to encompass career growth opportunities, quality of workplace environment, social consciousness of the enterprise, and consistency of message and purpose. As author Brett Cenkus headlined in his article in a November issue of The Startup, “Millenials Will Work Hard, Just Not for Your Crappy Job!”. During the many long years of job shortages, large segments of the workforce began to drop out of the labor force due to feelings of helplessness in gaining meaningful work. Whether victims of age discrimination, prejudice, poor matches of skills to available work or just losing out to more qualified candidates for the small number of jobs available, some people have simply given up the fight and found ways of subsisting on unemployment compensation, personal savings, earnings of a family member, disability, or other forms of government assistance. Now perhaps we can lure them back into the game. Employers will need to search beyond the “ideal candidate profile” which they could hold out for when there were multiple applicants for each job. Maybe qualified candidates were unfairly passed over for reasons that were based on stereotypes or not based in fact. Maybe it’s time to take a second look, and maybe it’s time for those applicants to revisit the job market. Perhaps management needs to broaden its perspective on the kind of person they envision filling important slots. Maybe training programs will have to be beefed up to provide the skills we have been trying to find in a pre-packaged new hire. It might be time to think about the culture we are asking new employees to be a part of and how that looks to someone joining us from the outside. The answers are there to the worker shortage, but it may not be as easy or as simple as managers hope. But those who adapt to the new circumstances will be the ones who are able to staff their companies adequately in this new age of worker shortage. JIM TRUESDELL

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